Tag Archive: politics


Why Minerva M


Well i started a website called Minerva M, and here is why I started it. If you like it please support us 🙂
The need for the creation of Minerva M came from one single fact, that is the immediate need for change in India and the only pioneers of this can be the indian youth. We realized that the youth do not really feel connected with the politics and economics of the country, and if we need to bring about a revolution, the youth need to be more informed and educated.
The amount of illiterate indians is high, but the amount of educated indians which are still uneducated in the politics, economics and working of the country are also high.
We are here to try and bridge the gap, We are a part of the crowd, a part of the youth trying to spread the message. We are Minerva M.


Corruption is one of the biggest problems plaguing our country right now. Despite numerous attempts to remove corruption from its roots, we stand here at this point in time having failed miserably to tackle the problem of Corruption. Anna Hazare and his team started the Jan Lokpal movement over a year ago and having lost much steam they plan to restart the agitation, but is this enough?

Corruption is a very old science. I refer to corruption as science because there is more to it than just giving bribes and getting your work done for a cost.
Now if you look at the Indian administrative system, the volume that the department has to handle is huge, the incentive that the government workers get in terms of their salary is not huge when you compare it to the private sector. The free houses and utilities they get, they have become used to it and it no longer qualifies as a perk for them. Let us try peeking into the life of a government agent.

The child of a government worker comes to him and says, “Dad in class everyone has a PS, why can’t I have one too?” the father will explain to him saying, “Son, Your Dad does not earn as much as their fathers and I cannot afford it.” It will kill him to say this and deny that worldly pleasure to his son but he will do it once. The next year when his son asks him for a new “Nike” football because his friends believe that only Nike is the good stuff, he will tear a little piece of his heart but buy his boy the expensive football because after all how many times does his son get a good birthday gift? Soon his wife starts coming to him and says that all the other ladies in the government colony use expensive make up and go out shopping, but why is it that we do not have enough money to do all of this? How can he explain to his wife that while the other officers in the colony accept bribes, he has stayed true to his belief and not accepted a single bribe.

Is his belief more important than his family’s happiness? The man is in a dilemma. He consoles himself by saying that he is doing the right thing and it is the best for everybody, but he himself knows the hollowness of these words. Soon he loses the will to fight the battle alone because he is not getting benefits nor is it bringing him any happiness. He goes to the office the next day and starts accepting bribes and soon see’s the happiness return back in his family’s eyes. That is how he justifies his corrupt nature.

If there are x corrupt officials in a government agency, there are 2x non-corrupt officials. But we always have a tendency to look at the corrupt ones and frown saying the whole agency is corrupted, but how do you think that makes the non-corrupt officials feel? Is it possible that our disdain and hatred towards a government agency since the last 20 years because part of it is corrupt, has actually caused the non-corrupt officials to become corrupt?

Let us have a look at the common man, a typical Mussadilal(We will call him Mussadi) if you remember the show “Office Office”:

Mussadi is missing his office today because his son needs a driving license. His son has “threatened” him by saying that since every one of his friends has a driving license; it does not look “cool” if he doesn’t have one. Regretfully he agrees to use one of his personal days at the office and accompany his son. When he arrives at the RTO, he sees a line as big as the line for rations at his village. After waiting for 2 hours he gets the form, filling it up quickly, he and his son rush to the officer to get it verified. This time he finds an even bigger queue disappearing into the room. At this point, his son says “Dad, I need to meet my friends so I am going to go but please stay here and get my work done. Thanks” and leaves. Having no option he stays there in the queue. Just then a man walks up to him and says that why are you standing in the line and doing all this “magajmaari”, just hire an “agent”. He enquires about how much the agent would charge and on finding that it would cost him a whopping 1000 bucks decides he is better of alone. There are 4 different departments to visit in an RTO and it is absolutely necessary to have an agent, otherwise you are not taken seriously. After getting the forms verified and then getting the payment slip done, getting your driving test done is a nightmare as the officer in charge is permanently surrounded by agents. As Mussadi would later come to realize at the cost of time and money that sometimes you just need to give in because unless the complete system is overhauled nothing can be really done.

These are exaggerated events no doubt, but what they are trying to is both sides of the story. Sometimes for a government official he might start the job with the best thoughts but somewhere along on the road, the pressure gets to you. Even for the common man it is a struggle to maintain a living and do the right thing. Sometimes it is just not feasible to stand up and be different because you cannot afford to. In the fight against corruption, we need to understand that it is a way of life for people. It might be easy for you and me to forgo 5 days of work and sit on the government officials head and refuse to pay a bribe, but for someone who needs to work just to maintain his family asking for those 5 days is too much.

I am not trying to justify corruption or in any ways defend it, just trying to say there is something more to the story.

-Shail Vani


Politics of India is an unusually complex subject to analyse. What is not very difficult to analyse is what has gone wrong with it. Today, even the average Indian would say that Indian politics is flawed. He would blame it on corruption, criminalization, etc that now characterize politics. In a way, this is a very accurate assessment of the problem. However, I think that this is the result of the problem and not the problem itself. In my opinion the problem begins at the level of political parties.

Modern Indian history of the post-Independence era accounts the formation of most of the present-day regional and national parties. The Indian National Congress was formed in 1885, with the objective of seeking representation for Indians in the British Indian legislative bodies. Of course, the Congress ended up securing freedom for the country later. The Congress party of today, though, is not the same party that won us Independence. Regardless of what most Congress members like to tom-tom about, the current Congress party is not the party of Gandhi, Nehru, Patel and Kripalani. The party used to be a democratic party until 1967, when Indira Gandhi took over. She scrapped all the intra-party elections and placed her own loyalists in key posts. This is not all – she also formed a new party, the Congress (I), in which the ‘I’ stood for ‘Indira.’ Till date, there is no thriving internal democracy in the party.

The other major party, the Bharatiya Janata Party too was formed in the 1980s, as a new avatar of the Jana Sangh that was the major Right wing organization with a pro-Hindu ideology. The Jana Sangh was opposed to giving special treatment to minorities. Many other regional and national parties were born in the last century of which the table below gives a brief idea about why they were formed or what they believed in.

Party Founded in Objective/Belief
Shiv Sena 1966 To represent the aspirations of the Marathi-speaking population of Mumbai
Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) 1949 To stand for Tamil pride and fuel secessionist demands for a South Indian Nation
Shiromani Akali Dal 1920 To unite the Sikhs of the Punjab region and to preserve Sikh ideology
Socialist Party 1948 To stand for the Socialist ideology
Communist Party of India 1921 To bring Communist rule in India and to bring reform to the old Indian agrarian system, etc along Communist lines

My point is that all these parties that were formed with an ideology – an objective in mind, are no more about that. No distinction can be made between parties on the basis of the principles, culture or belief of the organization. The truth is that parties have simply become outfits for people who want to be in power.

The BJP used to be a respected party during the Vajpayee-Advani era when the party had a set of beliefs. Unfortunately, they tilted towards a conservative or slightly orthodox approach. At least it was their own belief and they stood for it, come what may! The three Karnataka ministers who were caught watching porn in the Assembly were from the BJP. Had the party still been run on the principles of yore, these Ministers might have been suspended within a day. The same goes for Congress. The dignity of Congress party members during Prime Minister Nehru’s tenure is unmatched so far. Today, if the party leadership had any dignity it would not have allowed someone like P Chidambaram, who has so many allegations of compromising the country’s security (2G scam – spectrum re-sale to Dubai company, Etisalat) against him, to continue as Home Minister.

This is one reason that we see so many defections when an election is around. The belief of a political party is not set to much store as long as it’s giving the defector a ticket to contest. The Congress (or NCP) and the BJP (or Shiv Sena) have such diametrically different beliefs that it is funny to see someone from a saffron party to suddenly join the Congress or vice versa!

Why then are there so many parties? If there is no backbone of principle left for various outfits, wouldn’t it be convenient for them all to merge? Yes, it would. But that’s where the hunger for power in Indian politics continues to result in more and more organizations. The maximum number of divisions in political parties has been over who would become chief minister or who would get to lead the party. Hardly have parties been fractured over a disagreement over policy issues. To conclude, I would say that gone are the days for voters to pick parties. Party loyalties count for nothing as parties stand for nothing today! A wise voter must choose the best candidate, whichever party he may belong to. It doesn’t matter.
Akshay Marathe

(A Minerva M Writer)

You can read more articles at www.minerva-m.com


To All Indians,

“In India every entity is the Indian Parliament”. These words, spoken by my computer class professor made me think. In India it is not uncommon for people to have an opinion on everything. It does not matter whether you are hearing about a topic for the first time or you are doing your research on it, people act like they are the experts of everything. Well this is not true but you cannot stop people from talking can you? The hottest topic for debates and heated discussions in India is “Politics”. Everyone is interested in what our politicians are doing and everyone is busy cursing the politicians for their corrupt practices. What we fail to see is that this is not the first time a politician was corrupt or this is not the first time when the government has overlooked the general good of the public. Then why is it that everyone is talking about them only now?

The Battle against corruption has been going on since a long time, since the time of License Raj to be more specific. Then why is it that we Indians have never been able to form a dent in this ever-rising steel building of corruption in our country? The answer lays within us my friends; it is the Indian approach to every problem and situation. We have this mentality of “Comfort Zone” since a long time. If a problem does not concern us personally why bother? We can see this everywhere, how many times have we taken an initiative and helped a complete stranger? How many times do we go out of our way to do something for the greater good? I am not asking anyone to be heroes, all I am saying is that it is in our hands to do small stuff that may seem insignificant but plays a huge role when everything adds up. I would like to give you a simple example: Whenever we go out and buy a packet of chips, 2 times out of 10 that packet ends up in the dustbin. Now if everyone were to do this wouldn’t the packets add up? Even if we see that there is a dustbin 100 meters down the road, only a few would go out of their way and throw the packet into the bin.

Throwing trash into the bin is something that has been campaigned for a long time, yet I find myself finding at trash in all the wrong places (gutters, sewers, open land, water). Why is it that the message has not sunk in yet? Let us look at a bigger example, the most talked about person in India today Mr. Anna Hazare. This person achieved fame and recognition almost overnight. Some people call him the ‘Savior of India’ while some call him an ‘Attention Seeker’. To me he is none of those two; he is one of the few Indians who are ready to stand up for what he believes. Something that only a few of us know about Anna Hazare is that this is not the first time he is doing something for the county. Back in the 70’s his village Ralegaon Siddhi was facing severe drought. This one man was responsible for completely turning around the situation of the village. He introduced use of non-conventional energy resources like solar and wind power, installed proper sanitation means and turned a drought stricken Ralegaon Siddhi into India’s model village. Now we had our first modern village 25 years ago and yet it is so difficult to find the use of non-conventional energy sources in the current ‘Big Cities’ of India. The reason for all of this is the “Indian Comfort Zone”.

Just a couple of hours ago I saw this video on YouTube. The Finn Air flight to Delhi on 26th January our republic day was not like ordinary flights. Aboard the plane the Finn Airlines cabin crew stewards, air hostesses were dancing on ‘Om Shanti Om’ doing Bollywood steps wearing Salwar Kameez and extremely enjoying themselves. I could also see some people singing along with the song in Hindi. It made me think that if foreigners can show such interest and pride in our country why can’t we? Our Republic Day Parade is where our glorious army marches and our weapons are shown off to the world, but how many of us actually saw the parade. I did not see it but next year I will because it is time that we Indians become proud of what we have and decide that we need to change for the better. The line from Rang De Basanti is a classic” No Nation is perfect, it is the people who need to make it perfect”. It is high time we stand up and take a stand to correct our countries path. It is high time we stand up and take a stand and prevent selfish politicians to rule our country. It is high time we stand up and get out of our Comfort Zone and make a difference for our country.

Shail Vani

(A Minerva M Writer)

Read more articles at www.minerva-m.com

Minerva M


Hey everyone,
I write for a site called Minerva M so if you want to please visit the site below

www.minerva-m.com
I have posts on various topics will keep updating here as i keep writing for now the links are below
 The Indian Comfort Zone
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